Holly Case

Holly Case is Professor of History at Brown University. Her research interests focus on 19th and 20th century Europe and cover inter alia questions of territorial revision and treatment of minorities, WWII, the history of European renewal and federative schemes, and the relationship between social policy, culture, and foreign relations. She is the author of the award-winning book Between States: The Transylvanian Question and the European Idea during World War II (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2009) and co-editor of the volumes Yugoslavia and Its Historians: Understanding the Balkan Wars of the 1990s (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2003, with Norman M. Naimark) and The Global Impact of 1989 (special issue of Global Society, vol. 24, no. 1, January 2010, with Florian Bieber).

IWM Fellowships
September 2016 – June 2017
June-August 2018
August 2019-January 2020

Fellowships

Fellowships
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A history of consuls and consular reform in and around Southeastern Europe and their role in transforming the international system over the course of the last two centuries.

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The project is twofold, one entails continuing research for a history of the role of consuls and consular reform in transforming the international system over the course of the last two centuries. The second is tentatively titled “The Temperature of Our Time.” Out of small details measured across time and space—from owner’s manuals to packaging labels to philosophical works to private correspondence and overheard speech—the project will compile histories of the present by extracting various “vital signs” from historical and present sources.

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Description: My project covers a period in modern history— roughly 1810 to 1950—when “questions” reigned. The Russian writer Leo Tolstoy wrote his views on the “Eastern question” through the character of Levin in Anna Karenina, the future president of Czechoslovakia penned over 700 pages on the “social question,” and a German novelist expressed his immoderate views on the “oyster question.” When and why did people start thinking in terms of “questions,” and what did it mean?

Publications