Russia / Transit

Der Hitler-Stalin-Pakt 1939 in der europäischen Geschichte und Erinnerung

In den letzten Jahren beansprucht Moskau zunehmend die Deutungshoheit über den Zweiten Weltkrieg und seine Folgen. Putins jüngste Versuche, den Hitler-Stalin-Pakt zu rehabilitieren, sind ein weitere Schritt in dieser Richtung. Vor dem Hintergrund der Annexion der Krim und der Destabilisierung der östlichen Ukraine mittels verdeckter Operationen und hybrider Kriegsführung sind die Befürchtungen in der Ukraine, aber auch in den baltischen Staaten verständlich, dass Moskau gegenwärtig an die in den späten 1930er Jahre angeblich gängige diplomatische und völkerrechtliche Praxis anknüpft, Einflusssphären auf Kosten staatlicher Souveränität zu definieren.
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When Stalin was Hitler’s Ally

As Russia revives the tradition of wars of aggression on European territory, Vladimir Putin has chosen to rehabilitate the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact as good foreign policy. But why violate now what was for so long a Soviet taboo? Timothy Snyder explains.
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Russia’s Never-Ending War against “Fascism”. Memory Politics in the Russian-Ukrainian Conflict

Seventy years after the end of World War II, writes Tatiana Zhurzhenko, the fight for hegemony in Europe continues – disguised as a conflict of historical master narratives. The beginning of the current round of memory wars in the post-Soviet space can be dated back to 2005, when the sixtieth anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany turned into a loyalty test for the politicians of neighbouring countries.
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A Deadly Game of Hide-and-Seek: Why a Diplomatic Solution in Russia/Ukraine War is Nowhere in Sight

When Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov emerged after negotiations in Berlin on January 21, he had a simple message for the media: there may be thousands of people killed in the ongoing war in Ukraine, but you have no proof that it is done by Russian troops or Russian weapons.
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The New European Disorder

The annexation of Crimea has forced the EU to confront the fact that its post-modern order is not going to take over the continent, let alone the world. Whilst the EU has done better than its critics imagine in holding together in the face of Russian aggression, Europeans have not united around a strategy for moving beyond the current disorder.
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Putin’s Self-Destruction: Russia’s New Anti-Corruption Campaign Will Sink the Regime

This spring has been almost eerily calm in Russia. The protest movement, which coalesced after the rigged parliamentary elections in the autumn of 2011, has all but disintegrated, and hopes for substantive political opening have faded. High-profile liberals are in retreat or retirement, a dozen opposition activists are in jail, and President Vladimir Putin’s will is unchallenged. Even the weather has been nice, perhaps lulling the Kremlin into believing that it has little to fear. In fact, it does …
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Under Western Eyes.
How meta-narrative shapes our perception of Russia – and why it is time for a qualitative shift

The Illustration of The Great European War

Taking a social-constructivist perspective, the article profiles the impact of cognition on Western interpretations of Russian historical development. The starting point is the tenacity of particular Russia memes; the empirical basis for the article is provided by the output of influential thinkers, scientists and practitioners that dominates discourse. Since the nineteenth century this ideological output has situated Western-Russian relations within a meta-narrative of freedom and democratization. This meta-narrative has alternated between two operating modes: an Orientalist search for a Russian civilizational “black box”, on the one hand, and a missionary vision, driven by an aspiration to recreate Russia in the Western image, on the other.” During the Cold War era the meta-narrative was enriched by new scientific narratives, “path dependency” and “patrimonialism”. The article stresses the need for “competing narratives” and concludes with suggestions as to what agenda might replace superseded Russia narratives, as well as the wider “super-story”.
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The Perm Cultural Revolution

When, ten years ago, Richard Florida first argued that cities with a lively cultural scene and a high concentration of artists, technology workers, gay men and lesbians — “creative folks” — encouraged rapid economic development, he turned into a star overnight. His theory became the most discussed topic in cultural and urban studies circles. Florida …
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The Politics of No Alternatives or How Power Works in Russia

An interview led by Ivan Krastev and Tatiana Zhurzhenko On 27 April 2011 the Russian Presidential administration announced it had terminated its contract with well-known “political technologist” Gleb Pavlovsky. His fall from grace was reportedly linked to “indiscreet comments” made about the 2012 presidential elections. A short while before, he was a guest of the …
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Getting Reset Right

The collapse of the Mubarak regime in Egypt and the American president’s decision to side with the Arab street, sacrificing one of Washington’s longest and most important strategic allies, compelled many observers to ask two questions: Are we witnessing the end of Obama’s realism; and how will the lessons of Cairo affect Obama’s policy of …
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