Democracy / Transit

Fukuyama Turned on His Head: Democracy and the Market Economy Might Not Prevail

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The wealthiest nations of the world are all in deep economic and political crisis. Explanations abound. Many come from those in such difficulties themselves, with a tendency to find the most grievous failures not in the own backyard but among other wealthy and democratic countries. But such polemics ignore the obvious: namely that the difficulties besetting the most wealthy and democratic regions of the world have much in common and are rooted in similar causes: The further the advance in wealth, the greater the difficulties of continuing with the model of market based economic expansion. The longer the duration of democratic governance, the weaker the capacity of this democratic system to escape political blockage, to deliver rational decisions and a sound administration of public goods.
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Public Space Democracy

We are witnessing a new type of worldwide protest. From the Arab world to the Western capitals, from Turkey to Brazil, a wave of protest movements, despite the differences among them, reveal a profound social malaise, a gap between society and the political agenda. All solicit new approaches to established concepts of democracy. Tahrir Square …
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Putin’s Self-Destruction: Russia’s New Anti-Corruption Campaign Will Sink the Regime

This spring has been almost eerily calm in Russia. The protest movement, which coalesced after the rigged parliamentary elections in the autumn of 2011, has all but disintegrated, and hopes for substantive political opening have faded. High-profile liberals are in retreat or retirement, a dozen opposition activists are in jail, and President Vladimir Putin’s will is unchallenged. Even the weather has been nice, perhaps lulling the Kremlin into believing that it has little to fear. In fact, it does …
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Steven Beller

Geschichte, Cambridge
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Frivolous cohabitation.
Preparing the soil for a Jobbik takeover?

János Mátyás Kovács, a Hungarian economist, talks to Karolina Wigura about deep sources of Jobbik’s popularity and longue durée consequences of Victor Orban’s legal carpet bombing.
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Raiders’ State

Even Ukrainian cultural journals have become the target of “raiders” – shady groups working on behalf of powerful interests who use bogus property claims to close down businesses. The biggest raider of all is the Yanukovych government itself, says Mykola Riabchuk.
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Europe’s Democracy Paradox

Greece will push the French banks down the chute first; but German banks won’t avoid it, and together will finish Italy off. With luck, Italy will suck Spain into the abyss; Portugal will follow Spain, and Ireland Portugal. … Then continental banks lock their doors and the cash machines dry up. Minestrone kitchens appear on …
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How Democracy Can Save Europe

The European crisis, which we process from headline to headline as a matter of currencies and bailouts, is really a test of large-scale democratic capitalism. The disintegration of the Eurozone would be nearly as disastrous for the US as it would be for Europe; the result would almost certainly be a global financial meltdown that …
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What the Bulgarian Elections Mean for the European Union

Plevneliev’s Victory And The Dogs That Didn’t Bark “Elections don’t change anything,” reads graffiti scrawled across a wall in the center of Sofia. “If elections change[d] something, they would be banned.” In the wake of this month’s presidential and local elections, which culminated in a runoff for the presidency over the weekend, this may seem …
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As Ohio Goes: A Letter from Tea-Party Country

As Michele Bachmann contends for the Republican nomination, we might ask what her Tea Party means for her native midwest. In southwestern Ohio, where I was born and raised, mantras of low taxation and small government have become the way to avoid discussing the challenges of globalization. Beneath this region’s soothing triple green of maize, …
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