Violence and the Gift – Challenging Continental Philosophy of Religion

JCRT_Fall2015-3

The collection of papers in this special issue began at the conference “Violence and the Gift: Challenging Continental Philosophy of Religion,” which took place on April 25-26 2014 in Vienna, Austria. The meeting was organized by the Institute for Human Sciences (IWM) in cooperation with the University of Vienna as part of the research project “Religion beyond Myth and Enlightenment”, underwritten by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF P 23255-G19). Designed as an expert meeting to bring together renowned scholars in the field, it sought to address the meaningful potential the confluence of the topics of “the gift” and “violence” could have for continental philosophy of religion today.

Violence & the Gift: Challenging Continental Philosophy of Religion, Special Issue of the Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory (JCRT), vol. 15, no. 1, Fall 2015
(Guest Editors: Ludger Hagedorn, Jason W. Alvis and Michael Staudigl)

 

Recent Publications

  • Europe at the Crossroads: Confronting Populist, Nationalist, and GlobalChallenges

    The extreme right wing is on the rise. And there are signs that part of the political mainstream in Europe, the US, and beyond is considering going along with far-right populist parties and their divisive, ethno-nationalist programmes. Europe at the Crossroads is an urgent scholarly response to the sociopolitical challenges that far-right programmes pose to …
    Read more

  • Migrants and City-Making: Dispossession, Displacement, and Urban Regeneration

    In Migrants and City-Making Ayse Çaglar and Nina Glick Schiller trace the participation of migrants in the unequal networks of power that connect their lives to regional, national, and global institutions. Grounding their work in comparative ethnographies of three cities struggling to regain their former standing—Mardin, Turkey; Manchester, New Hampshire; and Halle/Saale, Germany—Çaglar and Glick …
    Read more

  • The Age of Questions

    In her book, Holly Case presents chapter by chapter, seven distinct arguments and frameworks for understanding the age. She considers whether it was marked by a progressive quest for emancipation (of women, slaves, Jews, laborers, and others); a steady, inexorable march toward genocide and the “Final Solution”; or a movement toward federation and the dissolution …
    Read more