Bloodlands. Europe Between Hitler and Stalin

T. Snyder: Bloodlands

In the middle of Europe, in the middle of the twentieth century, the Nazi and Soviet regimes starved, shot and gassed fourteen million people in a zone of death between Berlin and Moscow. These were the bloodlands – today’s Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, western Russia and the eastern Baltic coast. In a twelve-year period – 1933 to 1945 – as a result of deliberate polices unrelated to combat, an average of more than a million civilians were murdered annually. At the end of the Second World War the bloodlands fell behind the iron curtain, leaving their history in darkness. In this revelatory book Yale historian Timothy Snyder offers a groundbreaking investigation of Europe’s killing fields and a sustained explanation of the motives and methods of both Hitler and Stalin. He anchors the history of Hitler’s Holocaust and Stalin’s Terror in their time and place and provides a fresh account of the relationship between the two regimes. Using scholarly literature and primary sources in all relevant languages, Snyder pays special attention to the testimony of the victims: the letters home, the notes flung from trains, the diaries found on corpses. Brilliantly researched, profoundly humane, authoritative and original, Bloodlands re-examines the greatest tragedy in European history and forces us to rethink our past.

Recent Publications

  • Europe at the Crossroads: Confronting Populist, Nationalist, and GlobalChallenges

    The extreme right wing is on the rise. And there are signs that part of the political mainstream in Europe, the US, and beyond is considering going along with far-right populist parties and their divisive, ethno-nationalist programmes. Europe at the Crossroads is an urgent scholarly response to the sociopolitical challenges that far-right programmes pose to …
    Read more

  • Migrants and City-Making: Dispossession, Displacement, and Urban Regeneration

    In Migrants and City-Making Ayse Çaglar and Nina Glick Schiller trace the participation of migrants in the unequal networks of power that connect their lives to regional, national, and global institutions. Grounding their work in comparative ethnographies of three cities struggling to regain their former standing—Mardin, Turkey; Manchester, New Hampshire; and Halle/Saale, Germany—Çaglar and Glick …
    Read more

  • The Age of Questions

    In her book, Holly Case presents chapter by chapter, seven distinct arguments and frameworks for understanding the age. She considers whether it was marked by a progressive quest for emancipation (of women, slaves, Jews, laborers, and others); a steady, inexorable march toward genocide and the “Final Solution”; or a movement toward federation and the dissolution …
    Read more