Heft 7: Macht Raum Europa / Magisches Prag?

Transit

Transit 7

Frühjahr 1994

Macht Raum Europa

Alte und neue Alternativen der europäischen Raumordnung.

Otto Kallscheuer
Raumordnung und moralische Verwirrung.
Zur Einführung

Pierre Hassner
Das Zentrum als Peripherie.
Zur geopolitischen Situation Zentraleuropas

Claus Leggewie
Space – not time? Raumkämpfe und Souveränität.
Zu einer “Geopolitik” multikultureller Gesellschaften

Juan J. Linz
Staatsbildung, Nationbildung und Demokratie.
Eine Skizze aus historisch vergleichender Sicht

Reinhart Koselleck
Diesseits des Nationalstaats.
Föderale Strukturen der deutschen Geschichte

François Fejtö
Das zweiköpfige Ungeheuer.
Ideologische Quellen der “ethnischen Säuberung” auf dem Balkan

István Deák
Siegerjustiz?
Die Nürnberger Prozesse und die Kriegsverbrechen auf dem Balkan

Richard Rorty
Menschenrechte, Vernunft und Empfindsamkeit

Cornelia Klinger
Ein Streit, der keiner ist?
Zur Debatte zwischen “Liberalen” und “Kommunitaristen” in den USA

Magisches Prag?

Das Ende der Legende vom magischen Prag.

Susanna Roth
Einführung

Peter Demetz
Die Legende vom magischen Prag

Michal Ajvaz / Sylvie Germain / Daniela Hodrová
Die andere Stadt.
Aus drei neuen Prag-Romanen

Bohumil Hrabal
Die Laureaten.
Begegnungen mit Heinrich Böll in Prag

Josef Jedli?ka
Umzug nach Prag.
Ein Kapitel Alltagsgeschichte

Ivan Diviš
Was meine Augen sehen mußten

Witold Krassowski
Die Rückkehr der Kosaken. Kasachstan 1993
Photographien

Transit Issues

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  • Hobbesian Catholicism on the Rise in Poland?

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  • Poland vs. History

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  • Self-Reflection Through the Visual: Notes on Some Maidan Documentaries

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  • Committee for the Defense of Democracy in Poland: Rebellion of the “Beneficiaries of the Transformation”?

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  • Rohith Vemula: Death and Resistance at the University

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  • An Unruly Younger Generation? Student Protest and the Macedonian Crisis

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  • The Case for Europe: An Interview with Donald Tusk

    The fact is that around Europe, and within it too, there’s no lack of enemies of liberal democracy, and it certainly requires constant mobilization and readiness to defend it. But I am much calmer about it. If we take the area surrounding our continent into consideration, liberal democracy is still doing pretty well in Europe.
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  • On Krzysztof Michalski’s “The Flame of Eternity”

    For Krzysztof Michalski, the reflection on time, on what time is, provides philosophy a ground from which to illuminate essential aspects of the human condition, including its paradoxes and inherent ambiguities.
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  • When Corruption Kills: A Romanian Tragedy

    On November 3, around 30,000 demonstrators gathered in the center of Bucharest. They demanded the resignation of the prime minister, Victor Ponta, who had been accused of corruption-related crimes months before. There were cries of “Assassins” and “Shame on you”, and some people had banners reading “Corruption kills”. Ponta announced his resignation the next morning.
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  • Why Putin Loves Trump

    Mr. Putin’s predilection for Mr. Trump has nothing to do with the Kremlin’s traditional preference for Republicans. It also can’t be explained by the fact that had Mr. Putin — a physically sound, aging, gun-loving and anti-gay conservative — been an American citizen, he would have fit the profile of a Trump supporter. Rather, Mr. Putin’s puzzling enthusiasm for Mr. Trump is rooted in the fact that they both live in a soap-opera world run by emotions rather than interests.
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  • In Defence of Free Movement

    Asserting a human right to free movement without explaining how it could be accepted by states as a norm of international law risks disconnecting moral critique from political reform. In the present world the admission of refugees and other forced migrants must be governed by principles of human rights, humanitarian duties and burden sharing between states rather than by a right of free movement.
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  • “Let’s Go England!”: Multiple Facets of the Jungle of Calais

    The jungle is presented in the media as an informal settlement where hardly any service is available, where 4500 people from Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria or Eritrea converge in the hope of crossing the Channel and setting foot on the British soil. Is it really a place of exception, where the rule of law is suspended and the only function of the state is containment?
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  • Student Protest as the Trigger for the Revolution of Dignity in Ukraine

    By now it has been nearly forgotten how the events started that led to Yanukovych relinquishing power. Nevertheless, it was exactly on the grassroots level that some of the most interesting developments took place such as the appearance of a student protests movement which became crucial for the Euromaidan movement and whose fate paradoxically directly triggered the Revolution.
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  • Parsing Populism: Who Is and Who Is Not a Populist These Days

    Donald Trump is but Bernie Sanders isn’t; Syriza is, sometimes. Contemporary populism is not just anti-elitist, but also necessarily anti-pluralist, and in this exclusive claim to representation lies its profoundly undemocratic character.
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  • Where Do We Want the EU’s Borders to Lie?

    The centres and camps that already exist at Europe’s borders (and those being proposed) are not simply de-territorialized, exceptional, ‘waiting spaces’ where European rights do not (yet) apply. They are rather sites that are crucial to the sorting and organization of the right to European rights, through a principle of differentiated inclusion. Access to the right to asylum is thus no longer regulated through physical presence on national territory, but determined in geographically-dispersed locations.
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