Timothy Garton Ash

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies at Oxford University, where he currently leads the www.freespeechdebate.com project, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. Further more, Timothy Garton Ash is member of IWM’s Academic Advisory Board. His latest book is Facts are Subversive: Political Writing from a Decade Without a Name.

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Ukraine: How to Close the Door on Putin

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The European Union must develop a 10-year plan for Ukraine. This plan will also define what Europe itself will be a decade hence. In tribute to Europe’s pivotal politician, who has clearly led Europe’s evolving policy towards Ukraine, we might call it the Merkel plan. If it succeeds, a characteristically European version of liberal order will have prevailed over the conservative, nationalist recipe for permanent, violent disorder represented by Vladimir Putin. If it fails, Europe fails again.
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The 1914 in the Wars of 2014

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There is war in Europe. No, I'm not using the historic present tense to evoke August 1914. I'm talking about August 2014. What is happening in eastern Ukraine is war – 'ambiguous war' as a British parliamentary committee calls it, rather than outright, declared war between two sovereign states, but still war. And war rages around the edges of Europe, in Syria, Iraq and Gaza.
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In Europe’s week of 30 elections, only one is pivotal – and it’s not in the EU

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If Ukraine can hold a democratic election for its president next Sunday, there's a hope it can return to peaceful negotiations.
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The struggle for Ukraine has just begun

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Remember, remember: this is about the whole of Ukraine, not just Crimea. Vladimir Putin knows that. Ukrainians know that. And we must not forget it. There is nothing we or the Ukrainian government can do to restore its control over Crimea. The crucial struggle is now for eastern Ukraine.
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Ukraine, Crimea and the Unmaking of Empires

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Here is another way to think about what is happening in Ukraine: as the latest chapter in the self-decolonisation of Europe. After dismantling the Soviet empire at the end of the short 20th century, Europeans went back to finishing off the Austrian-Hungarian and Ottoman ones, including successor states such as Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia. Now it is the pre-Soviet Russian empire that is being challenged. Think of Russia's president as Tsar Vladimir the Last.
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Ukraine Stands on the Edge. We Should Do More to Bring It Back

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Ukraine has not yet died – as the country's anthem observes. But the face of Ukraine today is the bloodied, scarred face of the opposition activist Dmytro Bulatov. Comparisons with Bosnia are still far-fetched, but think of this as a political Chernobyl.
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