Human Ends and the Ends of Politics

Human Ends and the Ends of Politics

Junior Visiting Fellows’ Conferences, Vol. XXIII
IWM, Vienna 2009 [Published on the Web]

Edited by: Martin Black and Kirsten McKillop

Contributions by: Parveen Akhtar, Margherita Angelini, Martin Black, Stanislaw Burdziej, Kirsten McKillop, Astrid Peterle, and Irena Ristic

Preface

The purpose of this Preface is to explain how our title, “Human Ends and the Ends of Politics,” reflects the research which is presented in the papers that follow. In the first place, our title points to the inevitable distance between the ends or aspirations and purposes of individual women and men, on the one …
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Transience Participation: The Politics of First Generation Pakistani Migrants in the UK (Post-1945)

Post-1945 migrants to the UK from Pakistan and the Indian subcontinent more widely generally consisted of single men who were seen as, and who saw themselves as, transient economic migrants. In the early days of migration Pakistani Muslims were reluctant to take part in British politics for four main reasons: first, their interests were still …
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Writing Contemporary History in Italy between Fascism and Democracy

I. The Second World War and the alliance with Germany During the collapse of an authoritarian regime, an important process of the cultural passage to democracy is coming to terms with the recent past.[1] History, therefore, seems urgently relevant to societies that want to understand the legitimacy of their past government. Intellectuals are asked to …
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Is There a Crisis of the Modernity? The Problem of Theory and Practice

  I. Introduction In Vienna in 1935 the philosopher Edmund Husserl read a paper entitled “Philosophy and the Crisis of European Humanity” by which he intended “to awaken new interest in the oft-treated theme of the European crisis.”[1] In another lecture in 1935 Husserl spoke on “The Crisis of the European Sciences and Psychology.”[2] The …
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Civil Religion and the Sources of Legitimacy

  The presidency of George W. Bush in the United States and the first draft of the EU Constitution in Europe provoked substantial public interest in the complicated relationship between religion and politics on both sides of the Atlantic. In Europe, the proponents of what Richard J. Neuhaus called “the naked public square” – the …
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The Philosopher’s Peace: Lasting or Final? Kant and Democratic Peace Theory

Since the beginning of political philosophy, peace has been considered to be a high if not one of the highest ends of political action, but anyone looking to account for what we mean by peace faces the fact that we seem to understand peace not on its own terms but only in relation to its …
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Thinking through Subversion in the Time of Its Impossibility

While first preparing this paper, I named it “A Short History of Subversion.”[1] But I changed the title because I would have set you on the wrong track with it. In this paper I will not tell you a story of subversion. I will rather give you an insight into my own history with the …
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“Hell Is Other People”:
Kinships among the Yugoslav Nations

During a meeting in Naples, while World War II was still going on, Winston Churchill allegedly asked Tito, the communist leader and later lifelong Yugoslav president, how he imagined that he would keep together the various peoples which constituted Yugoslavia, especially if one considers their large historical, cultural, and linguistical differences. “If someone attacks us” …
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