Freedom, Justice, and Identity

Freedom, Justice, and Identity

Junior Visiting Fellows’ Conferences, Vol. XVIII
IWM, Vienna 2005 [Published on the Web]

Edited by: Thomas Nesbit and Justin Steinberg

Contributions by: Christoph Bärenreuter, Uner Daglier, Michal Luczewski, Thomas Nesbit, Justin Steinberg, Mathias Thaler, and Matthias Till

Freedom, Justice, and Identity – Introduction

  The papers within this collection are as diverse as the people who wrote them. Coming from the United States and Europes old, new, and soon-to-be, these individuals found quarter at the Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen between the months of July and December 2004. In addition to national differences, almost every one of …
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Spinoza and the Problem of Freedom

The concept of freedom is undoubtedly central to Spinoza’s philosophy. Indeed, as one distinguished commentator has noted, “the only evaluative distinction finally recognized in his philosophy, other than the distinctions between true and false, and between adequate and inadequate, ideas, is the distinction between freedom and servitude.”[1] And yet, despite its centrality, Spinoza’s account of …
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Positive Progress or the Crisis of Enlightenment

In the following pages, I intend to examine—for lack of a better expression—the metaphysics of Mill’s faith in the future of scientific progress. To put it in another way, how optimistic was Mill on the coming of the age of reason? How confident was he that his arguments for free expression applied in practice? In …
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Otto Mühl and the Aesthetics of Seduction

In the 1960s, the Viennese Actionists were united under the common task of liberation. For these artists, liberation was broadly conceived, ranging from breaking the limitations of artistic materials to more abstract freedoms, including moral, aesthetic, and even metaphysical forms. Otto Mühl and Hermann Nitsch envision the more abstract conceptions of liberation in critically different …
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Accounting for Humanitarian Intervention:
Some Remarks about the Cost of Taking Sides [1]

Periods of warfare are probably the best times in which to witness the strange overlapping of morals, politics and law. Today, we can perceive many different reactions to this confusion (apart from the ever prevailing disgust and dismay): appealing to rational arguments in order to establish a lawful consensus, withdrawing from politics in order to safeguard one’s moral integrity, praising the role of power and interest in order to identify the true motivations behind any moral claim....
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Just Numbers?
Theoretical and Practical Considerations on the Measurement of Poverty in Rich Societies

While value judgments render a purely rational and scientific solution impossible, a particular definition of poverty may still be widely recognized and accepted. One such widely accepted notion of poverty has evolved recently for the European Union. Following the Union’s commitment to “combat social exclusion” and the need to monitor progress towards a reduction of poverty, a framework of statistical indicators has finally been endorsed at the Laeken European Council in 2001. These indicators on social inclusion derive from the so-called structural indicators....
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Researching the European Public Sphere and Its Political Functions. A Proposal [1]

With the signing of the treaties of Maastricht (1991) and Amsterdam (1997), the European Union (EU) reached a degree of integration that clearly exceeds heretofore known forms of intergovernmental cooperation. Nowadays the life of EU citizens is affected in many ways by regulations made in the EU’s institutional labyrinth. Due to these far-reaching competencies, a debate on the democratic foundations of the EU polity developed in the 1990s, involving both the social sciences and partly also the broader public.
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What Remains for Nationalism Studies?

  After decades of unprecedented development in both nationalisms and nationalism studies, nationalists surprisingly have many more reasons to be satisfied than researchers. While nations and nationalism flourish, scholars seem analytically more and more confused. Although there are more articles, books, and journals on nations and nationalism than ever before, there is a growing sense …
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