A Captured Moment in Time

A Captured Moment in Time

Junior Visiting Fellows’ Conferences, Vol. X
IWM, Vienna 2000 [Published on the Web]

Edited by: Adrianne Rubelli and Nina Vucenik

Contributions by: Gallina Andronova, Judith Boesch, Ilia Iliev, Katarzyna Leszczynska, Adrianne Rubeli, Laurentiu Stefan-Scalat, Natalija Vrecer, and Nina Vucenik

Introduction: A Captured Moment in Time

“It is interesting to see what is important to others,” a junior fellow recently remarked at one of our informal gatherings, where discussion meandered through an array of though-provoking opics. This, at first glance innocent, sentence perfectly illustrates the essence of the fellows’ residence at the Institut fur die Wissenschaften vom Menschen. Active interest in and constructive dialogue with others who belong to different academic disciplines and national backgrounds, in varying stages of personal and intellectual development, form the basis of our understanding...
Read more

Umkämpfte Zugänge zur Schrift. Theoretische und historische Aspekte geschlechtsspezifischer Autoridentitäten im französischen 17. Jahrhundert

In this article I analyze some theoretical and historical aspects of the relationship between authorship and gender in 17th century France. I am especially interested in the gender-specific access to authorship and writing as well as in the construction of female and male author identities. In the first instance I discuss different theoretical approaches to authorship which - with reference to poststructuralism - all have in common the dismissal and deconstruction of the myth of the creative original genius. Instead they declare the author to be the symptom of specific discourse constellations, a semantic field of forces or the point of intersection of different discourses...
Read more

Pallas Athene oder Wie man die Frau zum Verschwinden bringt

Pallas Athene gilt allgemein als mutterlose Tochter ihres Vaters. Hesiod berichtet aber, daß die erste Gattin von Zeus, Metis, Göttin der Weisheit, die ihm zur Eroberung der Macht über die Welt verholfen hat, vom beunruhigten Gott verschlungen wurde, als sie von ihm ein Kind erwartete. Zeus wurde nämlich geweissagt, daß Metis’ Sohn den Vater stürzen, Metis’ Tochter ihm gleichwertig sein würde. Diese Geschichte bezeugt zwar, daß Athene eine Mutter hatte, „durch die sie im Leibe des Zeus ausgetragen wird und die den verschlingenden Gatten zum Gebären befähigt und zwingt“, verändert jedoch nichts an der symbolischen Bedeutung der Pallas-Gestalt, sondern läßt eher ihre Gebundenheit an die männliche Welt noch deutlicher hervortreten.
Read more

The Social Construction of a Saintly Woman in Bulgaria

The Bulgarian family underwent significant transformations during the second half of the 20th century. One of the new and interesting patterns that emerged was the practice of entrusting grandmothers with the upbringing of children. Before the 1950s, this task was predominately a mother’s duty. This change provoked rearrangement of the age roles within the family, especially concerning child rearing. Today, older women, often the grandmothers, carry out activities that a generation earlier defined the mother’s role in the family...
Read more

Human Costs of Temporary Refugee Protection: The Case of Slovenia

Asylum on a temporary basis has a long history; however, it became wide spread especially after the collapse of ex-Yugoslavia (Goodwin-Gill 1996). Many Bosnian refugees, and later refugees from Kosovo, were protected temporarily. As both groups of refugees went into exile in a foreign country in great numbers (an estimated 1.2 million Bosnians and 900,000 refugees left Kosovo), the response of the host countries in dealing primarily with the immediate needs of refugees, providing mainly food and shelter, seemed logical. It seemed logical during the initial arrival period to the host country, but not as a long-term solution. My claim is that temporary refugee protection in the case of ex-Yugoslav refugees inefficiently replaced long-term durable solutions and thus considerably lowered the quality of the lives of refugees...
Read more

Threats to Sovereignty: The Case of Macedonia in the 1990?s

This paper will examine the complexity of Macedonian society, showing that its unique situation is a result of historical factors, as well as external and internal influences. The fledgling democratic nation maintains peace and stability in one of the world’s most volatile regions despite past and present challenges to its sovereignty. This paper will undertake a contemporary examination of Macedonia and its transition in the 1990’s from a republic of Yugoslavia to a sovereign nation. After holding free, multi-party elections in January 1991, Macedonia is beginning its tenth year of independence and democracy...
Read more

USAID’s approach to NGO funding in Slovakia and Hungary

Most studies that assess assistance to Eastern Europe for democratic and economic transition focus on its overall impact-successes and failures. They either analyze the progress of one country or of one sector across several countries, but none examine the actual process of grant giving from inception to conclusion, the chain of transactions between a foreign donor and local recipients. In this paper, I focus on grants given for the development of the non-governmental sector....
Read more

Ideological Content of the East European Financial Sector Reform

Neoliberalism was envisioned as the leading ideology to drive the development of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) from a communist to market-oriented economy at the beginning of transformation. Politicians and reformers embraced the ideas of democracy, competition, individual rights and private property, and propagated them passionately. It was the “West” – open and inviting – which was held in absolute awe in contrast to the failed socialism and its economic damages...
Read more

Pacts and Conflicts in Post-communist Transformations: In Search of a New Social Contract

After a decade of radical transformations, it is probably time to ask ourselves about the foundations of the revamped political communities of Eastern Europe. This is a perennial and a timely question at the same time. It admittedly belongs to the family of those crucial issues that haunted political philosophers for centuries. It is timely, because at the end of the twentieth century East European polities have been faced with the daunting task of recasting themselves, of “reinventing” themselves through politics...
Read more