Topics in Feminism, History and Philosophy

Topics in Feminism, History and Philosophy

Junior Visiting Fellows’ Conferences, Vol. VI
IWM, Vienna 2000 [Published on the Web]

Edited by: Dorothy Rogers, Joshua Wheeler, Marína Zavacká, and Shawna Casebier

Contributions by: Dorothy Rogers, Agnieszka Zembrzuska, Katharina Pewny, Marina Zavacka, Rafal Wnuk, Irina Ognyanova, Joshua Wheeler, Eric Manton, Maureen Finnigan and Dimitar Kambourov

Hegel and His ‘Victims’ on Women in the Private Sphere

As noted by others, feminists generally have followed one of two paths when they address such statements by male predecessors: apologia or critique. The first option usually involves a sort of explaining away in which the thinker is said either to have “really” meant something else, or simply to have been a product of his time. The second option accepts no excuses, but instead offers a counter-attack in which the thinker is read and interpreted through feminist eyes. Both approaches have their merits. But here I offer a third alternative which neither apologizes for nor blames Hegel, but instead asks: What were the practical effects of his ideas? As suggested by Seyla Benhabib I want to look at Hegel from the point of view of “the victims” - i.e., women. How did Hegel's ideas about men/women, public/private, objective/subjective affect women in the nineteenth century who were familiar with his work?
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The Socialist Model of Woman in Poland and its Soviet Prototype

The task of this paper is to give account of the socialist model of woman that on one hand was following the example of the corresponding Soviet model, and on the other to certain degree had to take account of the local particularities. No effort is needed to notice that basic principles of the revolutionary concept of woman, such as equality of sexes and emancipation through work, were alike in the Soviet Union and Poland (as long as in the others countries of Eastern bloc), nevertheless there are various dissimilarities emerging from diverse traditions and use made of them by Polish socialist propaganda...
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Staging Difference: Theater-Representation-Politics

In this article reflections on representation and mimesis will be presented through a close look on Elfriede Jelinek’s recent play “Ein Sportstück.” These reflections will first will be contextualized in their disciplinary origins and theoretical background...
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Always Unanimous: Slovak Communists Reflecting on Foreign Policy (1939-43)

Unanimity, stability, and eternal unchangeability as a confirmation of the righteousness of the ascended path—such is the impression given a reader of the official Communist party interpretation of history, written for propaganda purposes. However, the history of historiography is to a great extent linked with the history of its own relation to changes concerning the political climate. This process can be elucidated by tracing the gradual penetration of information about uncomfortable facts, for about persons and their views, into official publications, following the development of Communist reflections on such facts and changes...
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Nationalism and National Policy in Independent State of Croatia (1941-1945)

The history of the Independent State of Croatia (ISC) has been systematically misrepresented by Serbian and some Croatian scholars (mainly Marxist), propaganda, and mass media for decades. This is one of the main reasons that historians nowadays deal with this topic and try to reveal the truth about the Second World War on the territory of the former Yugoslavia. The act that the Ustasha government tried to banish the Serbs from ISC, terrorizing and killing them, has been used by the Serbian anti-Croat propaganda since the war as a proof of the Croatian genocidal nature and of its pro-fascist orientation. This was an extremely sensitive topic, which explains why it had been avoided by Croatian historians for decades...
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History of the Anti-Communist Conspiracy in Poland after the Second World War (1944-1956)

Research on the anti-Communist conspiracy is in its early stages in Poland for many reasons. First, for over fifty years historians had no access to any documents concerning the conspiracy. This applied both to the documents issued by the Secret Police and to those produced by the Polish underground and kept in the archives that belonged to the Secret Police. Secondly, former members of anti-Communist conspiratorial organizations did their best to hide their past. Those, who had been labeled “public enemies” as well as their families were deprived of all chances of getting a decent education or a good job...
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Revisiting the Problem of Non-Coercible Rights in Kant’s Legal Philosophy

Immanuel Kant is not known for mincing words. Normally terminological and grammatical complexity cloak a philosopher in the safety of multiple interpretations. With Kant, however, these two salient features combine with a third, namely systematicity, and tend instead to push him further out on a philosophical limb. Nowhere is this more apparent than in his moral philosophy, where one encounters such terms as ‘categorical imperative’ and ‘apodeictic’. The most notable example of Kant’s stringency is perhaps the desert island case from the 'Rechtslehre'...
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Ideology and the Politics of the “chorismos”: Patocka’s Critique of Ideology

Since the Fall of the Wall in 1989, there has been a desperate search for some new dogma to fill the vacuum left by the collapse of Communism. While this search has been manifested as the reemergence of traditional religions and the adoption of new-age cults, it has also included questions concerning the structure and nature of future political systems. Much debate has been devoted to whether and how these political systems should be used, whether by importation of Western models or renewal of older traditions, and there is also still discussion about the possibility of a “third way....
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Nietzsche’s Perspective: Beyond Truth as an Ideal

Controversy encumbers the philosophy of Nietzsche regarding his notions of truth and reality: whether he affirms or denies truth; whether truth is metaphysical, empirical, relative, or pragmatic; and whether reality can be known or is beyond our experience. I maintain that Nietzsche does not eradicate truth and reality. If he did, why would we bother to read his works, as is own philosophy would then not be true?
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Literary Institutions and the Institution of Literature in the Wake of Theory

Literature is vanishing, no doubt about it. Literature searches in vain, not finding anything to say. And anything said about it vanishes as being literally inscribed in literature that vanishes. The ambition to write about such a predicament without falling into literature's abyss is a kind of vanity, as usual in vain. The more so as, contrary to its long self-lamenting tradition, literature now hardly finds the strength or will to announce its decline, wrapping its failure in muteness...
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