Violence and the Gift – Challenging Continental Philosophy of Religion

JCRT_Fall2015-3

The collection of papers in this special issue began at the conference “Violence and the Gift: Challenging Continental Philosophy of Religion,” which took place on April 25-26 2014 in Vienna, Austria. The meeting was organized by the Institute for Human Sciences (IWM) in cooperation with the University of Vienna as part of the research project “Religion beyond Myth and Enlightenment”, underwritten by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF P 23255-G19). Designed as an expert meeting to bring together renowned scholars in the field, it sought to address the meaningful potential the confluence of the topics of “the gift” and “violence” could have for continental philosophy of religion today.

Violence & the Gift: Challenging Continental Philosophy of Religion, Special Issue of the Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory (JCRT), vol. 15, no. 1, Fall 2015
(Guest Editors: Ludger Hagedorn, Jason W. Alvis and Michael Staudigl)

 

Recent Publications

  • Tomaten. Die wahre Identität unseres Frischgemüses. Eine Reportage

    Mehr als sieben Jahre lang verfolgte die Journalistin Annemieke Hendriks den Lebensweg der Tomate vom Samen bis zum Supermarkt. Dabei reiste sie kreuz und quer durch Europa und geriet mitten hinein in die bizarre Welt des globalisierten Nahrungsmittelmarkts. Im Gespräch mit Züchtern, Lobbyisten, Umweltschützern und anderen Experten stellte sie Fragen, die jeden von uns angehen: …
    Read more

  • The Ukrainian Night. An Intimate History of Revolution

    A vivid and intimate account of the Ukrainian Revolution, the rare moment when the political became the existential What is worth dying for? While the world watched the uprising on the Maidan as an episode in geopolitics, those in Ukraine during the extraordinary winter of 2013–14 lived the revolution as an existential transformation: the blurring …
    Read more

  • War and Memory in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus

    This edited collection contributes to the current vivid multidisciplinary debate on East European memory politics and the post-communist instrumentalization and re-mythologization of World War II memories. The book focuses on the three Slavic countries of post-Soviet Eastern Europe – Russia, Ukraine and Belarus – the epicentre of Soviet war suffering, and the heartland of the …
    Read more