Bloodlands. Europe Between Hitler and Stalin

T. Snyder: Bloodlands

In the middle of Europe, in the middle of the twentieth century, the Nazi and Soviet regimes starved, shot and gassed fourteen million people in a zone of death between Berlin and Moscow. These were the bloodlands – today’s Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, western Russia and the eastern Baltic coast. In a twelve-year period – 1933 to 1945 – as a result of deliberate polices unrelated to combat, an average of more than a million civilians were murdered annually. At the end of the Second World War the bloodlands fell behind the iron curtain, leaving their history in darkness. In this revelatory book Yale historian Timothy Snyder offers a groundbreaking investigation of Europe’s killing fields and a sustained explanation of the motives and methods of both Hitler and Stalin. He anchors the history of Hitler’s Holocaust and Stalin’s Terror in their time and place and provides a fresh account of the relationship between the two regimes. Using scholarly literature and primary sources in all relevant languages, Snyder pays special attention to the testimony of the victims: the letters home, the notes flung from trains, the diaries found on corpses. Brilliantly researched, profoundly humane, authoritative and original, Bloodlands re-examines the greatest tragedy in European history and forces us to rethink our past.

Recent Publications

  • vec_transformation-of-foreignpolicy

    The Transformation of Foreign Policy

    The study of foreign policy is usually concerned with the interaction of states, which date back to the so-called “Westphalian system,” also the time at which modern “foreign policy” vocabulary was invented. Given the close semantic ties between the two, examining foreign policy in earlier as well as in later periods involves conceptual and terminological …
    Read more

  • Border Crossings

    Border Crossings: Grenzverschiebungen und Grenzüberschreitungen in einer globalisierten Welt

    Die vielfältigen Transformationsprozesse im Zuge der Globalisierung stellen herkömmliche politische, gesellschaftliche und kulturelle Grenzen zunehmend in Frage. Die erhöhte Mobilität von Menschen, Kapital, Gütern, Bildern und Informationen und die durch Telekommunikationstechnologien ermöglichte dichte Vernetzung von Individuen und Organisationen über nationalstaatliche Grenzen hinweg lassen die Globalisierung als Epoche der Grenzüberschreitungen erscheinen. Damit wird jedoch keine entgrenzte …
    Read more

  • Paradoxes of Peace in 19th Century Europe_web

    Paradoxes of Peace in Nineteenth Century Europe

    ‘Peace’ is often simplistically assumed to be war’s opposite, and as such is not examined closely or critically idealized in the literature of peace studies, its crucial role in the justification of war is often overlooked. Starting from a critical view that the value of ‘restoring peace’ or ‘keeping peace’ is, and has been, regularly …
    Read more